Kenneth Rijock

Kenneth Rijock

Friday, September 4, 2020

WHO IS NAMED IN THE SEALED INDICTMENT IN THE ALI SADR HASHEMINEJAD CASE ?



If you thought that the case against the Iranian sanctions evaders, Ali Sadr Hasheminejad and Bahram Karimi, would end with their dismissal, think again. A check of the case docket shows, if you look closely, sealed documents placed in the vault on September 1, and again on September 2. Does that look like a case that has concluded ?

There is a sealed indictment in existence, according to a source of proven reliability. This information should make certain present, and former, government officials in Malta and in Dominica sit up, take notice, and start auditioning experienced criminal defense attorneys admitted to practice before the US District Court in Manhattan. They might want to focus on counsel with serious experience in defending money laundering and RICO ( Racketeer Influenced Corrupt Organization) cases.

Why is the Indictment sealed, you ask ? Well, if the individuals who are listed as party defendants knew that there were criminal charges pending against them in an American court, which might result in long terms in Federal Prison, even up to a Life Sentence, they probably would flee to avoid arrest and prosecution. Given that all of them are outside the United States, which would require extradition proceedings, they could quickly relocate to a country with no extradition treaty, and evade justice, so the indictment will remain sealed until and unless they are in US custody. It will be unsealed when the individual defendants make their First Appearance before a US Magistrate Judge. That will be an unpleasant surprise, to be sure.

I have some pretty good ideas about who is included in the indictment, but I never kiss and tell, so my theories will remain closely held. It is important to remember that other defendants will surely be added to the indictment, from time to time, as Grand Juries hand them down. Given that, barring possible issues with the Statute of Limitations, the Government need not immediately seek extradition of the overseas defendants, especially since they may be in the process of adding more to the case, but the day will come, eventually, when the Government moves against its targets.

To quote some of my favorite song lyrics from the 1980s, Don't stop thinking about tomorrow, for it will soon be here; there will be some sleepless nights first, however.






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